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United Farm Workers of America Joins Change to Win Coalition

Friday, July 22, 2005

CHICAGO, IL - The United Farm Workers of America (UFW) announced today that it was joining the Change to Win Coalition, the new workers organization devoted to transforming the American labor movement.

"To realize our goal of organizing significant numbers of low-to moderate-wage Latino and immigrant workers in the face of fierce employer resistance during the next decade, we must move aggressively to apply new resources and make changes in our own organization," said UFW President Arturo Rodriguez. "We are convinced the Change to Win Coalition mirrors our commitment of finding new ways to refocus on organizing and vigorously pursue anti-worker employers."

"The Coalition is thrilled to have the Farm Workers join our efforts to improve the lives of millions of American workers," Coalition Chair Anna Burger said today. "This is a significant moment in American labor history. The Union of Ceasar Chavez is the heart and soul of the labor movement, and its affiliation with our Coalition sends a powerful signal that we are on the right course."

"The Farm Workers represent the highest aspirations of all American workers," Burger said. "Their historic commitment to organizing low-to moderate-wage workers is the essence of the Change to Win Coalition's vision of giving hope to millions of workers seeking the American Dream."

The Change to Win Coalition was formed on June 15, 2005 to marshal the collective strength of its unions (listed below) to develop and implement strategies to bring the labor movement into the 21st century. Since its inception, two additional unions, the Carpenters and the Farm Workers, have joined the original five. The Change to Win Coalition unions represent nearly 6 million workers.

Change to Win Coalition:
Teamsters
UFCW
UNITE HERE
SEIU
Laborers
Carpenters
Farm Workers

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